Easy Ways to Sell Clothes Online for Cash

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Depending on what research you listen to, the average American woman spends between $150 and $400 per month on clothing.

The average worth of a woman’s closet is anywhere between $1,000 and $10,000, averaging around the $4,000 mark.

That’s an awful lot of month sat in a small room in your house.

Not only that, it’s estimated that the average woman has around $500 worth of clothes that she has never worn!

If you’re looking to make some quick cash, and you’ve got a closest stuffed with clothes, shoes and accessories, then it’s clear that an easy way to make some money is to sell your clothes online.

How to Sell Clothes Online

If you’ve ever sold anything online before then your first though might be to heads over to eBay and list your clothes. Stop right there! There are plenty of other sites that you can use to sell used clothes.

Here’s my top 10 list (in no particular order):

#1 ThredUP

One of the oldest sites to sell used clothing, ThredUp mainly focuses on kids clothes but has expanded to include women’s clothes and accessories.

The general process is to request a bag, add your clothes and send it off. ThredUP then accept or reject the clothing and send you a payment for the accepted items. Anything not accepted is donated to charity.

The amount of money you make is usually quite low, but it’s all down to the brands you send off and the quantity.

#2 TheRealReal

This site focuses on high end designer clothes, but is just as easy to use as ThredUp.

The main thing to know here is that every item you send out will be reviewed for authenticity before being sold.

You will earn up to 70% of the final sale price for the clothes which isn’t too bad at all. Though remember, even though the clothes will sell for more as they are high end designer, don’t expect to get the price you paid for them.

#3 Material Wrld

Another site that focuses on higher end clothes, Material Wrld does things slightly different.

First it makes an offer which you can accept or decline, but they can ship your clothes back for free (or donate them) if you want.

The second difference is that you will not get paid in cash. Instead you can choose between a Material Wrld gift card or a specific retailer gift card.

#4 Grailed

Most sites online to sell clothes are focused on women, but what about men? That’s where Grailed has carved out a niche.

This site allows people to post their own clothes and set their own prices. The average sale price being $120, which is quite high.

Grail does charge a 6% commission on top of PayPal fees.

#5 Poshmark

If you don’t want to be tied to your desk while selling your clothes, take a look at PoshMark. This mobile app based service makes it really easy to set up an online closet and sell your clothes.

Its fees aren’t the best, at $2.95 for sales under $15 and 20% for over $15, but you get to set your own prices on clothes you sell.

#6 Tradesy

Sell your high end and designer clothes, shoes and accessories on Tradesy with no listing fee and competitive commissions. Tradesy only takes 9% if you keep funds on their site (to buy other clothes with) or 11.9% if you want to take the cash.

#7 SnobSwap

SnobSwap can be a little snobby for sure as they only accept items from a pre-determined list of designers. That being said, it is a large list!

The commission rates are OK, with their seller’s fee being 15%.

Sadly, SnobSwap has stopped accepting individuals as sellers, so you’ll actually need to be a boutique or professional seller.

#8 Storenvy

If you’re into designing and creating your own clothes, shoes and accessories, then Storenvy might be the place for you.

This site allows up and coming indie brands to showcase and sell their wares, and you can set up a full e-commerce store for free in just a few minutes.

This is really great for designers as not only do Storenvy handle the technical side of things, but their rates are cheap too, at 0% – 10% (excluding transaction fees).

#9 ReFashioner

ReFashioner focuses on vintage and cool clothing, and each item listed has a story behind it.

You’re run of the mill store bought clothes won’t get listed here. Even designer pieces will struggle.

In fact, they have recently stopped taking on new listings due to a backlog of requests unless, according to the site owner, “your stuff is amazing and I love it!.

#10 ASOS Marketplace

If you have a large closet that is constantly being added to and changing, then the ASOS Marketplace might be for you.

Rather than selling individual pieces, you’re required to open an online boutique, which costs £20 (about $26) per month. You must also list between 15 – 20 items at all times, and follow their photography directions.

On top of the monthly fee, there’s also a 20% commission on sold items

These strict requirements will definitely rule out most people, but for some it could well be worth it, especially if you’re selling designer clothing, as you can set your own prices.

Go Social

If you’re not keen on selling on a marketplace or setting up your own boutique, then why not harness the power of social media.

You can sell your items on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Instagram even has its own hashtag for selling clothes: #shopmycloset

The benefits are a wider audience, but the downsides are having to handle everything yourself, and not have an audience that is specifically in the buying mood.

Go Oldschool

If in doubt you can always fall back on the old school sites like eBay and Craigslist. These sites can still work to sell clothes, but tend to have so many fakes and issues that they turn off a part of the audience that wants to buy clothes online.

The Bottom Line

If your closest is packed full of clothes you haven’t worn more than once, shoes you only admire rather than wear and accessories that are still in there packets, then you have the opportunity to make some cash back!

Each of the sites I listed cater for different closest types, from run of the mill clothing and kids clothes, to high end designers, and vintage clothing and everything in between.

The only thing you need to worry about is deciding on what clothes you’re willing to part with!

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