Quick Cash Shortcuts: A Case Study in Avoiding Scams

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If you’re just getting started with internet marketing you might be dazzled, shocked and awed by the sheer number of products out there that are supposed to help you make lots of money.

If there’s one piece of advice I can give you that will help you in your future online career, it’s this: think before you buy!

You see, most of the products out there that entice you with their flashy graphics, marketing spiel and promises of grand wealth are full of it.

Think Before You Buy

If you’re looking at a product, examine what it’s offering you. Look closely at the words being used. You will get two benefits out of this:

  • You won’t be scammed as easily
  • You’ll learn some marketing techniques

There are numerous red flags that you can look at that can help you spot a scam before you lose your money on a (or perhaps another) product that is designed only to suck you dry of money while feeding you a pittance of knowledge.

A Case Study: Quick Cash Shortcuts

Let’s look at a real life “make money online” product that you might buy in order to make some money online.

Quick Cash Shortcuts by Mo Latif is a great example.

What’s in a name?

A products name can shed a lot of light on not only what it’s designed for, but who it’s targeting and even perhaps its legitimacy.

Quick Cash Shortcuts. This name screams BS to me. Let’s break it down: it’s advertising that you can make money quickly, via shortcuts.

Unless you are the one in a billion who hits the Powerball, you aren’t going to get rich quickly by doing nothing.

The product name is targeting people desperate for money that will pay for a product in the hope that it can make them some much needed cash.

Why proof of profits are no such thing

Sites like Quick Cash Shortcuts make great use of showing you evidence of how their system makes hundreds or thousands of dollars a day.

In order to really get you interested in the system, they show screenshots of earnings.

Quick Cash Shortcuts earnings

It looks like you can earn so much, yet this proof is no such thing. There’s no evidence that these earnings were as a direct result of using the advertised system.

The person behind this system is a serial product maker, so it’s much more likely that the figures you see are actually for sales of previous products. If they were truly earned by using the system, there would be a little more evidence than numbers thrown on a screen.

Without evidence, these screenshots should not be trusted.

A sob story to engage you

Any good marketer will tell you that one of the best ways to engage with an audience is to tell a story.

Human beings have always been story tellers, ever since we could speak: that’s how history and culture was spread before the invention of writing.

Stories are powerful things and can evoke strong feelings in people. With Quick Cash Shortcuts, the story revolves around being broke, so it ties in with the name, in that it is targeting a certain vulnerable cross section of people, namely those who are already struggling to make ends meet.

Hype and hyperbole

Hyperbole (extreme exaggeration) isn’t so much a marketing technique as one that shady marketers use to  grab your attention and hold it.

The sales page for Quick Cash Shortcuts is littered with this style of writing.

“What if I told you, you’ve just discovered the greatest breakthrough system to making money online, fast?”

That quote is aimed to make you think that this system is the best thing since sliced bread that it’s something miraculous when in reality, it isn’t.

The sales page is so hyped up and full of hyperbole that it’s actually hard to figure out what the system actually is.

Quick Cash Shortcuts print money

P.S.S. Think about the time and money you have already wasted or are currently wasting on the next loopholes? Magic pills? Gimmick or flavor of the week? …

This product is literally called QUICK CASH SHORTCUTS.

Come on.

I would think this page were a parody of all of the get-rich-quick nonsense sales pages I’ve seen if not for the order form at the bottom.

Making a blind purchase

This is yet another red flag to me. If a sales pitch does not tell you explicitly how the system is designed to make you money, you should worry.

While there are many statements of how much this system can make you and how it’s easy and how it will change your life and so on, there’s not a single thing that tells you what it does.

Is it affiliating marketing? Solo ads? Is it PPC? Is it email marketing? Does it involve making mini-niche websites or authority ones? Are the techniques up to date?

How can you make an informed decision when you’re told absolutely nothing of substance about the product? Quite simply, you can’t. They are hoping the hype and hyperbole will blind you from this fact.

Sucking you into a funnel

Thinking before you buy is a wise thing to do, but sometimes you also need to do some research to support this.

With Quick Cash Shortcuts I Googled “Quick Cash Shortcuts affiliate” and checked the first few results. The 3rd one for me struck gold.

Here I found out that there are multiple upsells (further products to sell to you) that are “are multiples of $97s, $67s & $37s and some more” according to the affiliate page.

I investigated further and discovered there are 4 upsells (at least), costing $97, $67, $97 and $97.

If you get suckered into buying these, you initial $17 purchase sky rockets to $375!

Discovering the affiliate funnel can really tell you a lot about a product. A general rule of thumb is that if there are more than 2 upsells, it’s just there to do a cash grab on your wallet!

The Bottom Line

Whenever you are faced with a shiny new product that promises to make you a fortune in a short amount of time: stop and think!

Is what it’s saying believable? Is it too good to be true? Is there any real evidence that the system works?

If you apply those few questions to Quick Cash Shortcuts the answer is that it really isn’t worth risking your money on.

I didn’t buy the product solely on the basis that the sales page is just one marketing gimmick after another with ZERO substance. If you read the whole thing, you learn how easy it is to make thousands of dollars per day.

It’s your call if you buy this product or not, but please whenever you come across anything that promises you the moon and the stars, stop and think. Don’t get caught up in the hyperbole and don’t feel pressured with the claim that the “sales page will disappear at any moment!”

Programs like these don’t want you to think. They want you to give them as much money as quickly as possible and hope you forget about them until the refund period expires.

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