Can Facebook Bonanza Really Make You Money?

0 Comments
Post Pic

Quick Summary of Facebook Bonanza

Rating: 1 out of 5. A sales page full of lies does not bode well.

Pros: None.

Cons: Use of black hat marketing techniques. Fake testimonials. A lack of proof of earnings. No explanation of what the system actually is. Lack of company details. Numerous references to it being a scam online.

Our Recommendation: Avoid FB Bonanza, it has too many red flags marking it as a probable scam.

Full Review

There are many ways to make money online: from e-commerce to affiliate marketing and much more.

One popular way to earn some cash is by using social media as a platform to promote products.

With its 1 Billion daily users, Facebook is considered one of the best social networks to market on. It has a large user base, a detailed advertising platform and a solid business page system.

It’s these reasons why there are an abundant supply of Facebook training systems out there, some good, some bad, some amazing value for money and some sadly just a rip off.

Today I want to talk about one of the latter cases.

Introducing Facebook Bonanza

Facebook Bonanza is one of a growing list of systems devoted to helping you make money with Facebook. It pushes towards the newbie market citing that no technical skills are needed, quick and easy, etc.

The sales pitch for the program advises you that you’ll get access to free 1 on 1 training (after paying of course), video training guides, a personal automated money making website and the ability to make thousands in cash.

It sounds too good to be true and examining the sales pitch shows the cracks in its façade that confirm there’s something not quite right about this product.

Red Flags

The number of issues with the site is actually really worrying. For example:

Ads Seen On

fb bonanza ads seen on

The first thing you see on the site is a bunch of logos where the product has been seen. It’s not stating that the sites have reviewed or written an article about FB Bonanza, it’s stating its adverts have been shown on those sites.

It’s written in such a way that a quick glance will make you see the familiar phrase “as seen on” rather than “ads seen on”.

Lili Gil Video

This video clip of a CNN interview with Lili Gil has been used by hundreds if not thousands of dodgy marketers and scammers since its release.

The idea here is to help legitimize a potentially poor or scam product by association with a well-known and respective outfit like CNN.

The video itself doesn’t promote FB Bonanza or any other marketing product, but is more of a general overview of making money online with affiliate marketing or Swagbucks.

Fake Scarcity Tactics

One of the clearest indicators of a scam is when a site uses multiple scarcity tactics. A scarcity tactic is where it tries to convince you that you only have a limited time to take action, be it signing up or buying.

The site uses count down timers, messages of limited numbers etc in several places, including the checkout.

Of course none of these are real. The product never closes up and regardless of the timers you can buy it if you really want to.

fb bonanza scarcity 1

fb bonanza scarcity 2

Unknown Check & Earnings

Any make money program worth its salt will prove to you that it works and that you can make money with it. After all there’s no point talking the talk if you can’t walk the walk.

Providing genuine proof is hard, and most scam sites don’t even bother, but some like Facebook Bonanza provide what I call generic non-proof.

This is where they show you a check or an earnings screen confirming that they have made lots of money.

The problem is that the photos don’t prove if that money was made with the system or from something else entirely. There’s also the issue of Photoshopping these screenshots which is a real possibility, though not always easy to spot.

Fake Testimonials

FB Bonanza doesn’t even bother trying to hide the fact that it’s testimonials are fake.

The photos of people are stock imagery:

fb bonanza testimonial stock

The statements they use are used virtually verbatim on other sites:

fb bonanza testimonial quote

As well as that they state they don’t bother to validate testimonials (this can be translated as “they’re fake, we know it, and this is our get out of jail card”).

fb bonanza testimonial text

All in all these cannot be believed.

Downsells

Any product creator has to believe in their product and if they do they sell it at a price that is fair to them and their customers.

Product creators that don’t give a damn and are just after your money use multiple downsells to just make the sale.

FB Bonanza sells for $47 but if you closed the page but then stay as per the pop up, and do that twice, you magically knock off $20 bucks. That’s a 42% discount because they are simply desperate to get any money they can and more importantly to lure you in.

fb bonanza downsell

Spammer Heaven

If you buy this product or even take a closer look you will have just handed over your email at least, possibly your address and telephone number.

Now you will have to run the gauntlet of the people behind FB Bonanza selling you more things and other parties as your details will be sold off to numerous marketers, scammers and dodgy business who will get in touch incessantly.

As per the privacy terms:

We may also use your data to inform you and provide information on goods and services that may be of interest to you. We may also permit selected third parties to use your data for the same reason.

Name Changes

I can’t be certain of this, but if you go to the site and look at your browser tab, you’ll see FB Profit, not FB Bonanza. If you look at the downsell page, you’ll see a reference to Facebook Cash at Home Kit.

My assumption is that this site and product have been reused and re-branded multiple times in order to get past blacklists, legal issues and customer catching on.

Who’s behind FB Bonanza?

If you are looking for a training program in internet marketing, you should always do a background check to see the sort of people you will be dealing with.

In respect to FB Bonanza there’s not much info to go on. There’s no formal company name given, no address, no individuals name etc.

The best I could glean from the terms is that they have something to do with a site called easykits.org, and a company (I think) called Markenark.

The first two Google results for Markenark are scam related which is never a good sign!

Further research reveals other warnings for the full company name Markenark Holdings Ltd.

They are also based out of Cyprus for legal reasons, meaning you can kiss goodbye to any hope of resolving issues with them.

The Bottom Line

I didn’t buy this product. There’s no need when the sales page is full of lies. Could it have some solid information contained inside it? Sure; however, based on the highly suspect sales pitch and surrounding information, I highly doubt it.

There's only ONE program I really recommend. It helped me turn my 'hobby' into a $6,000+ per month money making machine. Click here for the exact formula I followed.

Leave a Reply