I’ve Tried That Reviews Mike Dee’s “The Rich Janitor”

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Quick Summary of The Rich Janitor

Rating: 2 out of 5. Not a scam but some portions of the program are borderline unethical, while others are outdated.

Pros: Mike Dee provides an outline of affiliate marketing and discusses blogging, linking, and setting up promotions. There is a members area, downloadable PLR books, and instructional videos.

Cons: Several selling strategies outlined in this program are likely to get you into trouble; other methods are outdated. To advance in this program and make money, you will need to purchase additional products. Refunds may be hard to come by despite claims and guarantees to the contrary.

Our Recommendation: The Rich Janitor offers some useful information on affiliate marketing; however, there are better and more contemporary programs on the market. This is an OK system at best, and would only benefit someone who knew almost nothing about affiliate marketing.

Full Review

If there’s one tried and true method for making money online, it’s through affiliate marketing. In a nutshell, affiliate marketing involves selling someone else’s product/service and collecting a commission from the sale.

You can make a one-on-one arrangement with the manufacturer or store and sell products/services directly; you can also sign up with affiliate networks like Clickbank and Amazon affiliates and sell an assortment of products/services.

Because affiliate marketing requires a number of skills like website creation and hosting, blogging, copywriting, graphic design, podcasting, etc., affiliate marketers often sign up with membership programs that train them and provide advice and troubleshooting support.

One such membership program is Mike Dee’s “The Rich Janitor.”

In this review, we go over the features and benefits of The Rich Janitor, including what we liked and didn’t much like about the program.

Our review of The Rich Janitor

The Rich Janitor starts off with so much hype and exclamation points that, at least initially, I thought it was another get-rich-quick scheme. Mike Dee uses a lot of the usual ploys and messages seen in many online scams, including promises of quick money and screen shots of accounts.

Rich Janitor

Mike’s 30+ minute introductory video has him spinning quite the tale about his financial woes, including getting fired from his middle school janitorial job for eating a sandwich that was thrown away, losing money on various Internet scams, and then using a secret software system to discover “money loopholes” that other Internet marketing gurus knew nothing about.

money loopholes

The video ends with Mike selling you access to his ‘Money Loophole’ software system, which he says cost him $9,700, for just $97. For that money, you also gain access to Mike’s members’ area, as well as his other videos and ebooks.

pitch in

At the top of The Rich Janitor sales page, there is a reference to a “free $70” from Mike for trying his software. You “earn” this money because he reduces the price of access from $97 to $27 in the checkout page.

So, should you buy into The Rich Janitor?

Buyer beware- The Rich Janitor has a rich backstory

After doing some online sleuthing of The Rich Janitor, I found some disturbing details about this program.

#1. Mike Dee doesn’t exist.

You would think that a guy selling an online business opportunity like Rich Janitor would have a Facebook page, LinkedIn page, etc. that showcases his software and members’ area. Nope. Mike Dee is a fictional name and used to be Mike Dougherty, as evidenced by the 2010 sales page for The Rich Janitor (courtesy of Wayback Machine).

The Rich Janitor1

However, even Mike Dougherty doesn’t exist online. The true owner of The Rich Janitor is actually someone named Ankur Patel (courtesy of WHOIS):

RichJanitor WHOIS

#2. The Money Loophole software is an article generator.

Wayback Machine is a very useful tool for digging up the details of money-making opportunities when they are first introduced- and before wise editors get a hold of the sales copy. For example, here is part of the 2010 sales copy of The Rich Janitor. As you can see, the hyped-up Money Loophole software that is very sparsely elaborated on in today’s sales copy is actually well described in the 2010 copy.

The Rich Janitor

What’s wrong with article generators? If you were launching a website back in 2010, an article generator would’ve actually helped your website advance in search rankings. Today, however, Google has outsmarted mass-produced and poorly composed articles through its algorithm updates. Nowadays, posting generator-produced articles is likely to get your website delisted from Google (and other search engines).

#3. The tutorial videos are simplistic.

Within The Rich Janitor members area are several videos that teach you how to do basic affiliate and Internet marketing.

Example videos include “Millions made online,” “Internet marketing,” “endless profits,” “Website fortune,” “Social networking CASH,” “Getting started- creating a Clickbank account,” “Build a website #01-04,” “Email broadcast with Aweber,” “Watch how I made Jack money,” Affiliate Marketing Blueprint (for beginners),” “The Profit Miracle Campaigns (for beginners),” “Article Machine Creator (Up close & personal with Jamie Lewis),” Article submissions (for beginners),” and “Clickbank marketplace (Up close & personal with Jamie Lewis).

Most of these videos are good for beginners who are delving into Internet marketing. The main problem, however, is that some of the noted techniques, like article generation, should not be done today.

#4. The ebooks are actually useful, however…

The Rich Janitor also packs several ebooks into its members area, including “Machine Gun Marketing,” The Official Profit Miracle Manual,” etc. These ebooks are not flimsy, 10-page manuals either. The includes useful ideas about creating ultra niche websites that most people haven’t heard of.

However, the techniques that are discussed in some of these ebooks border on the unethical.

For example, one of the suggested techniques involves scraping content from a free online resource, such as a free ebook, for example, and repurposing that content into a paid ebook (hmm…maybe this is how Rich Janitor’s own ebooks were created?). Such a technique might get you in trouble for copyright infringement at the very least. However, even if you don’t get caught, engaging in such content stealing is just sleazy.

#5. There are upsells.

Mike promises you that his secret software and access to the members area are a one-time charge only of $27. However, the actual Rich Janitor program contains many upsells, including a $97 upgrade, then a $197 bonus package, and finally an ultimate package priced at $497.

This is also why affiliates that promote The Rich Janitor are offered over $300 in commissions.

#6. Want a refund? Good luck.

The Rich Janitor claims that you have 60 days to use the software and ask for your money back. However, on the site’s terms and conditions page, there is an interesting caveat about how you claim your refund:
disclosure

It sounds as if the person or people behind this program will put up at least some resistance to your refund request by trying to “rectify” you.

Not only that, but here are some Rich Janitor customer complaints about the ease of getting a refund from this program:

Rich Janitor refund1

Rich Janitor refund

refund

The Bottom line

When it comes to trusting an online marketing program that will actually help you succeed, The Rich Janitor is found wanting. While I would not call this program and its tools an outright scam, there are enough rough patches here to warrant passing over this program and looking elsewhere for timely information and unfailing support.

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