Our Review of Mary Rodger’s Cash From Home System

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Quick Summary of Cash From Home (amongst others)

Rating: 1 out of 5. A link posting system that makes numerous false claims in order to lure people in.

Pros: The only pro from picking up this system is learning to be more careful in the future not to pick up dubious work from home systems!

Cons: The claim of making a large income from posting links is a false one and the use of duplicate sites back up that this is just another link posting scam.

Our Recommendation: The likelihood of learning how to make money online from this system is nil. At best you will walk away wiser when it comes to scams, but with a much lighter wallet. If you want to learn how to build a real, sustainable business from home, click here to check out our top recommendation. It’s free to get started as well.

Full Review

Cash From Home and its counterparts have been around for a few years now, offering the idea that you can make a decent amount of money for simply adding a link! There seems to be a resurgence in promoting them which is worrying. Let me explain why.

The Background

Cash From Home apparently highlights the success of a lady called Kelly Simmons who has a true rags to rich story.

The essence of it is that she was a struggling single parent who just lost her job – a story that we can relate to quite easily.

Supposedly she met a guy at a part time job who showed her his work from home system. Fast forward and boom! She’s a millionaire, and works less than part time.

This all sounds really appealing, I mean who wouldn’t want to work a couple of hours a day and rake in even just a reasonable amount of money?

The sad part is that Cash From Home is simply leveraging peoples hopes, desires and desperation to actively suck money from them.

How Does It Work?

The idea behind this system is that you post links and get paid per link. That sounds amazing, not only is it easy work but the price per links is about the same as a decent minimum hourly rate – $15 bucks for 4 minutes work.

The reality though is that you will never get paid $15 per link. Think of it this way, if people on Fiverr.com (who get paid $4 per gig) will manually add 35 forum links, or 25 links to educations sites, then how likely will it be for you to get paid $15 for a solitary link?

Not likely at all.

The Warning Signs

The sales page for Cash From Home has so many scam markers that it’s scary!

Just take a closer look at these and you’ll understand why this sort of system is nothing but a scam.

#1 System Name vs. Domain Name

This might seem unimportant, but the fact that the system name (Cash From Home) is different to the actual URL (SecureBusinessSites) is a telling marker.

What it suggests is that the people behind this scam are using cheap expired domains that have an air of legitimacy to push this system.

#2 The TV Logos & Video

cash from home tv

This is a popular psychological trick used by nefarious marketers. The idea is that the logos add a sense of legitimacy to the site even when they really have nothing whatsoever to do with the product.

The cleverly avoid lawsuits (just about) by using wording like “Work from home opportunities have been featured on:”. That statement is likely true, it just doesn’t mean that THIS system has been featured, but sadly not everyone picks up on that and instead subconsciously increases their trust in the site.

They also include a recording of a newsreel from NBC talking about work from home opportunities. This reel has been used in an incredible number of scam sites and is solely there to once again add a veneer of respectability.

#3 Unrealistic Promises

cash from home skills

Telling people that they don’t need any skills or experience is a great way to hook people in. Everyone would love to make money easily, but the truth of the matter is that making money, whether it be on or offline, does require skills and experience. Sure you can get that along the way, but to promise instant earnings with no skill set is misleading at best.

#4 Requesting Your Phone Number

This might seem a very minor thing, but really, why do they need your number? Simply, in order to sell you stuff! Once they have a number they will call you or sell it to someone who will try the same thing.

Typically, we see reports from people who signed up for these kinds of systems that suggest that they will call you and try and sell you a “big ticket” system that costs hundreds to thousands of dollars.

#5 The Calculator

cash from home calculator
Cash From Home conveniently provides you with a calculator that works out how much money you can make from using this system.

This provides you with a dopamine rush when you see the potential earnings, but does not really prove that those earnings can actually be made!

#6 The Dream

cash from home dream

One of the most powerful marketing tools available is to show you a dream and convince you that using this product will help you achieve that dream.

To be fair this sort of technique is used by all marketers, ethical and villainous alike, but at least the ethical ones will only use it when they have a product that can definitely provide the outcome. Link building simply doesn’t have that sort of future.

#7 Over Use of Highlights and Bolding

cash from home highlights

OK, so you may be thinking that this shouldn’t be a marker for a scam site, but it is most definitely one. By using highlighting and bolded text marketers can draw your attention to specific areas of the text, perfect for skip readers.

Scam marketers have a tendency to overdo it though and this is visible on the Cash From Home site.

For me, it’s also one of the easiest ways to spot a site that while maybe not a scam, it will surely warrant closer inspection.

The Duplicate Sites

If those points haven’t given you pause, then consider this: the exact same site (or 99% same) is used in other places.

Two sites called simple-income-strategies.com & access.premiere-online-income.com both use the same copy text and formatting, with some minor differences.

The main changes are the system name and logo, the name of the person with the success story and some images.

Mary’s name change made me laugh as apparently they all have a daughter called Amanda, and went through the exact same issues.

Ah, I hear you cry, but the disclaimer on Cash From Home states that they used fake names and stock photos.

That’s right it does, but let’s be honest here, just because they said they are using them to hide someone’s identity doesn’t mean they are telling you the truth. Plus the other two sites don’t contain that disclaimer.

The reality is that Amanda (or Kelly or whoever) doesn’t really exist. She’s simply a tool created by these marketers in order to invoke trust and convince you to hand over your details and money.

The Bottom Line

Link posting systems don’t work. Even if you make some cash from them, it’s not going to be life changing. In fact the only thing that these people want from you is for you to prove your gullibility by signing up in the first place.

From there they then have you by a hook and will slowly reel you in promising you the world while sucking money from your bank account.

Cash From Home has numerous markers that flag that this is at best an unscrupulous marketing ploy and at worst a scam.

Please, avoid link posting scams and Avoid Cash From Home and its duplicates!

How Does the Aussie Method Compare?

It doesn’t. It’s not a real opportunity. It’s a program designed to get into your wallet.

I’ve Tried That has been reviewing products since 2007. In that time, there’s one program that stands above the rest. It’s free to get started, has no ridiculous hidden charges, and will help you build a sustainable income from home.

Click here to see our top recommendation.

3 Comments

  1. My opinion of this website is the same as Mr. Robinson’s x’s 2. This is a SCAM PLAIN AND SIMPLE. I had been seeing these advertisements on the internet for awhile and figured I would try Simple Income Strategies. I paid my $97 and my receipt said I would hear from someone in a few days. I waited and no call, so I called again and left a message. Still no call so I called back twice more until someone, a Jim Wolf, got on the phone. I expressed my dissatisfaction and he tried to calm my fears by talking a bunch of bunk and telling me to go to ecommuniversity.com, a website to help you start your home business. I watched a video and took notes as directed and he called me back trying to sell me a program for $300+. I told him this was not why I paid $97, I only wanted to post links. He put me in touch with a Larry Nicklaus, ext. 7004, in the “link posting” dept, and he said he would send me an email with instructions on training. NEVER RECEIVED ANYTHING! I called back 3 times trying to get a refund to no avail. I have made it my goal to blast this and all related websites. I had never experienced internet scams before, and this was a bummer. You can tell I am a little passionate about this but I just don’t understand how people can look in the mirror if they are involved in this kind of business.

    Reply
  2. David Erwin says:

    Belinda
    I am right there with you an trying to get your money back is just as hard.

    Reply
  3. i purchased this program about a month ago and ust want to say that in my opinion. its not as easy as it was claimed to be.you go thru several steps and have to watch a bunch of training vidoes. Rory Ricord makes it seem so easy but still its quite confusing to me. you would really need to tae notes to better understand every step thru the process of posting links or you dont et paid.then you hae to learn about blogging and other things, making it more complicated. wow… thats really overwhelming. So as far as the program being so called easy, its not.

    Reply

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