A Push Button System and a Hidden Threat

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Quick Summary of Push Button Cash Machine

Rating: 1 out of 5. A poor quality product pushing illegal activity

Pros: The tutorial itself was decent in respect to helping you use the third party system.

Cons: It promotes a Ponzi Scheme! Thin content, padded to seem like more. Aggressively pushes the third party systems. The third party system could collapse at any time.

Our Recommendation: Push Button Cash Machine isn't a scam as such, but the scary thing is is that it promotes a Ponzi Scheme. Dangerous, risky, and illegal.

Full Review

Learning how to make money online is not easy.

Aside from the fact that the boards keep shifting and the rules keep changing, you have to contend with scam marketers pushing dodgy, unethical and useless crap your way.

These scam systems have a similar feel to them: they all offer a large income, without pesky things like skills, or monetary or time investment.

A common name for them is “push button” systems, in that you are supplied to click a button and boom, money flows into your account.

Back in the real world, we all know that this sort of system is bound to be a lie and fail to make you a dime. However when you are sucked up into the whirlwind of trying to learn how to make an online income, it’s easy to get sucked into these systems, spend your money and hope they work.

Along Comes Push Button Cash Machine

The first thing I did when I saw this system was scoff, I mean how can it take itself seriously when it’s got Push Button in its name?

Well, it doesn’t, or at least tries not to.

The sales pitch for Push Button Cash Machine (PBCM) acknowledges this:

The IM space has always taught that the term “push-button” was the best to describe an imaginary method of making money that cannot be achievable.

It goes on to say that of course, this system is different.

One thing that is different to most other push button systems is the amount of money it suggests you can earn.

Rather than shoving the dream of thousands of dollars a day at you, it says it will make you a sensible $50 – $70 bucks a day.

This is quite a refreshing change, but even with this, does Push Button Cash Machine really work?

Push Button Cash Machine

Buying the System

You can pick up a copy of PBCM for about $13 bucks, but it’s on a “dime sale” which means the cost is continually rising, after each purchase. It will eventually cap out, but at what price is anyone’s guess.

The first thing that happens once the purchase is made is that you get sucked into a sales funnel.

This is pretty commonplace for most internet marketing products.

The idea is to hook you with a cheap product that supposedly will do what it says and then upsell you for additional products, each one at a higher (sometimes much higher) price than the initial product.

PBCM’s upsells start with a $27 product that is a video walk-through of the product author using the system. This effectively is double charging visual learners as the base product is in text format.

If you refuse this, like I did, then it throws another offer at you: the same visual learning product but with 30% knocked off.

I always feel that when a product can be discounted so heavily, so quickly it’s not really got any intrinsic value.

The PBCM Product

The first thing I noticed about the Push Button Cash Machine guide was its length: 37 pages.

That’s not bad for a cheap internet marketing product; I’ve seen some that were barely 5 pages long!

Unfortunately the next thing I noticed was the fact that the font size was large, the line height (gaps between lines) was huge, and the first 10-11 pages were pure drivel: table of contents, disclaimer, “who am I”, etc.

Add a couple more pages at the end, and the actual product is only 24 pages long. Make the text somewhat normal, and you’re looking at about 10 pages of content. Well, shhhhii…

Sadly this is typical of most IM products.

Inside Push Button Cash Machine

The idea behind PBCM is to use another website called Triple Thr3at (and no, that isn’t a spelling error).

It took me a while to actually figure out what Triple Thr3at actually does.

In essence it is an advertisement network with a revenue sharing system. What this means is that you invest money to purchase ad blocks, and you should in theory make a return on the investment.

Triple Thr3at has 3 levels, which the author behind PBCM (Josh Meyers) suggests you only focus on levels 1 and 2.

The first level costs $10 per month and entitles you to a FB auto poster that promotes Triple Th3at, some general Internet Marketing tutorials and allows you to gain a commission on each person you recruit.

The second level allows you to invest in advertisement blocks and you get a return on the investment, the amount of which and the time it takes to obtain the return varies depending on the ad pack you purchase.

You also need to view adverts every day yourself – these adverts are other members adverts. Not quite sure why you need to do it, but you do.

As well as that you have to click a button every day (yup a real life push button system). The button must be clicked or you don’t make any money, even if your ad blocks are still working. The button resets at midnight CST time, so expect late nights!

Push Button Cash Machine earnings
Evidence of earnings. I don’t doubt you *can* make money with this system, it’s just risky.

Worries, So Many Worries

As I had very little idea how Triple Thr3at worked, I did some digging.

The first thing that sparked a worry was with their own FAQ:  “What happens when revenue doesn’t come in?”

The answer? You don’t get paid!

As well as that the withdrawal limit is set to $100 per day (weekdays only), though Josh states that as the community grows, so will the withdrawal limit – I saw no evidence of this.

Furthermore I did some wider reading on profit sharing schemes and the information I found was troubling.

In general, these sorts of schemes only work while new people are coming in, very similar to Pyramid schemes, and once the influx of willing participants fades, so do the earnings.

I learned is that it is a very common scenario, almost inevitable, for these revenue sharing systems to collapse.

Josh from PBCM suggests investing heavily and reinvest where you turn make more money, which generally is sound advice. In the context of Triple Thr3at and revenue sharing models though, the better advice would be to be aware of the risks and pull out your money as soon as possible to prevent loss of money when it collapses.

You Should Be Scared!

After even more research, it occurred to me: this isn’t a Pyramid Scheme, it’s a Ponzi scheme!

You see, the advert side of it is masking the fact that the earnings are driven from new members and money paid out is also from people investing.

This is especially the case as adverts that return the most take the longest (weeks) to come to fruition.

Also the Facebook marketing isn’t designed to promote your site (remember, no site needed!) but instead it promotes Triple Thr3at, generating more people to allow for short term investments to be paid off.

This system will fail, it will crash and burn and people will be left with nothing. Every Ponzi scheme will ultimately collapse. It’s just a matter of time.

The Bottom Line

Push Button Cash Machine isn’t a scam as such, however what it promotes certainly is!

If Triple Thr3at is a Ponzi scheme like I believe it to be, it is illegal! As well as that it is, for you, dangerously risky to be involved in!

In summary, while you most likely can make money with this system in the short term, the long term bodes ill and there is an incredibly large chance that you will fall victim to it and lose your money.

My advice – Steer well clear of both Push Button Cash Machine and Triple Thr3at.

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