Push Button Salary: Push a Button, Lose Your Salary

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Quick Summary of Push Button Salaries / Push Button Salary

Rating: 0.5 out of 5. This is a recycled scam from 2 months ago.

Pros: The sales video tells you right away that you'll be doing automated binary trading.

Cons: Push Button Salaries is just a recycled 7 Figure Club- and both programs are scams.

Our Recommendation: Don't fall for this remake of a binary options scam. Real money takes real work. Start with our top recommendation here if you want to learn how to really build an income online.

Full Review

Push Button Salary (aka Push Button Salaries) is currently offering a crazy deal to new subscribers:

“Ten invites, ten millionaires, in 27 days.”

The announcer, whose voice I’ve heard before on Magic Money Machine7 Figure Club and Free Profits, is looking to invite 10 new subscribers who will each earn $1 million in less than a month.

Push Button Salary

What if you don’t make $1 million in 27 days?

Exactly how you are going to get that $10,000 is not explained.

Also, this announcer is not looking for your sob stories about how you’ve been ripped off in the past by other online “gurus” or scam artists:

To its credit, Push Button Salaries tells you right away that it deals with binary options trading. Furthermore, the program gives you access to an automated trading system when you sign up.

That’s where the transparency ends, and the smoke and mirrors begin.

Push Button Salary is a remake of 7 Figure Club.

Back in August, I’ve Tried That published a review of 7 Figure Club. This program made the same promise about turning 10 subscribers into millionaires within 27 days. It also used some of the same individuals to provide glowing testimonials.

At this point in time, if you try to go to the 7 Figure Club sales page, you are redirected to Push Button Salary. However, the usual scam review sites that just posted positive reviews of Push Button Salary also posted positive reviews of 7 Figure Club. You can see from their provided screen shots that the same exact scam is being used.

One thing that has changed, though, is instead of BeeOptions being your “recommended” broker, you get Glen Ridge Capital.

Glen Ridge Capital is now your ‘recommended’ broker.

Once you get past the second sales video, you learn that Glen Ridge Capital is your recommended broker. I’ve mentioned Glen Ridge Capital in the past, and this broker is actually based in the U.K. Thus, if you have any issues with your trading account or deposit, you will be dealing with an overseas broker that is subject to different regulations than those in the USA or Canada.

I should also add that, in spite of Push Button Salaries claiming that you only need to deposit $250 to open an account with this broker, you actually need a minimum of $800.

The broker is “secure.”

After you enter your name and email address, you are asked to sign up with the “ISA certified” broker and make a deposit. What exactly is the ISA? Here is some information, according to Wikipedia:


According to Push Button Salary, the recommended broker is ISA-certified, and this certification is possible because Push Button Salaries works with only this specific broker.

I see a few problems with this claim. To begin with, the ISA no longer exists because it has merged with another bureau and been renamed. Second, the ISA is based in the U.K. However, when I first contacted the program’s customer support chatline, this is the information that I received:

glen ridge

Michael also went on to tell me that my specific broker would vary based on my geographic region. If that’s the case, then Push Button Salaries actually works with several brokers, not just one. That disqualifies this system from being ISA-certified, at least according to its own earlier claim.

Glen Ridge Capital is the “safest” and most “reliable.”

My chat conversation became truly laughable when I asked Michael whether or not Glen Ridge was regulated. It was the equivalent of asking if a milkshake was made with real milk and ice cream, and getting the answer “We have vanilla, chocolate and strawberry.” I’m guessing Michael figured he could distract me with promises of big money.

Push Button Salary 3
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The ‘positive’ reviews are full of affiliate links.

While Push Button Salary isn’t on Clicksure, it is listed on plenty of other affiliate networks. As a result, there are several ‘positive’ reviews of Push Button Salary, and each of these reviews contains an affiliate link like this one: 


Just how objective can a product review be when the affiliate stands to make a few hundred dollars from each new sign-up?

The news sources are simple decorations.

Push Button Salary shows the following proofs that its program has been featured in the news:

Push Button Salary 2

However, there is no way you can click on these news logos to learn more. When I performed a Google search on each of the listed news networks and Push Button Salary (or Salaries), nothing came up in the results.

The customer testimonials are fake.

Push Button Salaries shows these positive customer testimonials:


However, if you go to Fiverr, you’ll find these customers selling testimonials for $5/each.

7 Figure Club 8

Also, both the first and second guys shown here posted identical reviews for 7 Figure Club.

The customer earnings shots are also fake.

On the Push Button Salary sales page, you are shown the following “live earnings” shots of customers:

Push Button Salary 8

However, if you do image searches on those customer profiles, you learn that most of them are derived from stock photo sites like 1000faces, etc.

Summary: Don’t fall for this recycled scam.

Binary options scammers must be getting lazy because I’ve been seeing an increased number of recycled scams that are simply fit to different brokers. Push Button Salary is yet another of these recycled scams that will do nothing for your pocketbook except make it shrink. Steer clear of this scam.

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  1. Glenridge Capital is a scam! We have over 100 thousand dollars in the account and they’re not letting us widraw. They’re keeping our hard earned money. Do not invest with them, it’s a scam!

  2. Hi! My Dad just told me he invested money with this company and took 30,000.00 out on credit cards to do so, hes actually very sick and not in his right state of mind lately so I was concerned, when he told me how easy, it was to make some extra money! I dont know what to do now.. does this company allow you to take your money back with no penalties or hidden fees!?

  3. Glenridge Capital is a total scam, don’t invest with them especially if they offer you matching money. They won’t tell you and if you don’t notice in their contract you have to trade 30x the amount you invested plus what they gave you. It is like gambling with your winnings and losing everything. So if you actually win any of your trades you have to keep trading until you will eventually lose everything you invested. Don’t listen to their sales people. One will keep trying to get you to take money out on credit cards saying he will help you win big with his trades and their financial advisors have no idea what they are doing so don’t listen to anything they say to you. If you already deposited money get it back as quickly as you can and run

  4. I have also been scammed by Glenridge Capital and they have also ignored the documents I’ve sent confirming my account and ignored my request for a full refund. Please DO NOT invest with this “company” as you will only have your funds disappear into a black hole, never to return.

    1. Glenridge Capital is a company full of scammers. PLEASE STAY AWAY FROM THEM 1000 miles UNLESS YOU WANT TO LOSE YOUR MONEY
      Just ask yourself if it is honest why it does NOT have the following things:
      2. FAX NUMBER
      When they’ve asked me to deposit more money I’ve simply told them TO KISS MY ASS !

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