Trading Everest: Unlikely to Make a Mountain of Cash

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Quick Summary of Trading Everest

Rating: 1 out of 5. Less of a mountain and more like a deep dark money pit.

Pros: Absolutely none, it simply isn't a legit system.

Cons: The promises it makes are unlikely to be kept, no matter how much you pump into this system.

Our Recommendation: This "system" only offers a high risk, no guarantee of making money online: Binary Options. If you want a way to build a real business, read my top recommendation.

Full Review

Mountain climbing is a serious sport: it requires intensive training, skill and awareness, and involves a lot of risk to life and limb.

This week’s Binary Options review looks at a product that uses a famous mountain as its namesake: Trading Everest.

Unlike the necessary sills to scale a real mountain, this system promises that you barely even have to lift a finger to get to the top of a financial mountain.

Unfortunately, just like climbing to real peak, using this system could make you lose something important: your money!

Read on to discover exactly why this is the case.

The Pitch

The sales letter focuses around a sales video.

At the start, the narrator seems to hedge his bets a bit when it comes to discussing the gains. Instead of using most unethical marketing tactics and basically promising you the world, he uses phrases such as “very possible”, leaving a lot of leeway legally speaking.

The video goes on that suggest that you can turn $200 into $40,490 per week.  Yeah, you heard right: per week.

trading everest 40k a week

Suddenly from a very cautious script they decided to blow it out of the water and state that this particular Binary Options signals system can earn you $2.1 million a year, from an investment of just $200.

As well as that, the system is fully automated, so you would earn this wad of cash while doing absolutely zero!

Does this sound too good to be true?  Of course it does, because it is too good to be true.

The narrator states his name is Jason Gaines, and he was a top tier trader in New York’s stock exchange. The daily grind of earning a lot of money (aww), finally drove him to give up his corporate 9-5 day job.

Of course, as soon as he quit his day job he rings up an old friend of his who happens to be a computer and statistics nerd.

It amazes me how often I see variations of this story when reviewing Binary Options systems. It’s like they only have a few generic stories they can use, and simply tweak it here and there to differentiate it slightly from the hundreds of other systems using the same, tired spiel.

Apparently this geek, was able to create some advanced software that uses indicators, mathematics and past trades to predict Binary Options trades.

Let’s pause here a second. If you are not sure what Binary Options even are, let me explain in brief.

Binary Options are a type of trade where you state whether a trade will go up or down. The trade periods are not like normal trades and based over months or even years, instead they happen over a smaller time frame, normally 1 to 5 minutes.

With normal trades, you can expect to see a pattern either going up or down, but as Binary Options are on such a small time scale, it is virtually impossible to predict which way they will go. At best, you would be guessing.

Most Binary Options signals software, like Trading Everest, uses signals to predict what it will go, but it only bases this on the broader trend. A broad trend is fine, but trades at the micro level, spike up and down seemingly at random.

Let me also tell you straight: Jason Gaines is not an ex-trader with a genius geek high school friend. “He” is the pseudonym for a marketer that just wants to make money off of you.

If someone truly had a system that could accurately predict trades, they would either not be giving it out for free, or the trading market would collapse as the world finds out about it and puts it to good use.

They certainly wouldn’t be pushing it via a crappy website, and spammy emails.

trading everest mouthfull

Does this mouthful even make sense?

The video goes on and on about how this is amazing, and how it can generate vast amounts of money, and it uses lots of highbrow terminology.

What it doesn’t do at any point is offer up actual proof. In fact it doesn’t even bother to provide any fake proof!

Signing up to Trading Everest

Predictably, the sign up process is exactly the same for Trading Everest as it is for all the other scam Binary Options systems out there.

First you give them your email (all the better to spam you with, my dear). Then you have to actually sign up to the broker RB Options in this case, though they rotate them.

On this second sign up pager is another video trying to goad you into making the next commitment, as well as some stats that could be from anywhere, including being made up!

RBOptions is not a US based company, it’s either UK based or coming from the Marshall Islands in the Pacific. Either way, there is no US jurisdiction or oversight for this company.

According to the UK Companies House website, the parent company behind it is also possibly going into liquidation, even while it is still active!

After that, you would then need to hand over some cash to them.

I wouldn’t advise this, not least because Binary Options is a high risk way of making (or more likely losing) money, but I do not see any legitimacy for the site, so why hand over your card details to a site that might not be legit or even liquid next week?

The Bottom Line

Trading Everest is yet another Binary Options scam, designed to make you believe that a generic signals software is something magical.

The alleged $200 to $40,000 in a week should be making alarm bells ring for you, as the likelihood of it ever happening is about as good as you winning millions on the lottery 4 weeks in a row with the same numbers.

Avoid Trading Everest unless you happen to have spare cash lying around that you want to give to some scammers.

There's only ONE program I really recommend. It helped me turn my 'hobby' into a $6,000+ per month money making machine. Click here for the exact formula I followed.

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