Confirmed Profits- Confirmed to be a Scam

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Quick Summary of Confirmed Profits

Rating: 1 out of 5. There's nothing of merit here whatsoever.

Pros: Let me get back to you on that.

Cons: Con #1: You could infect your computer with this sham software. Con #2: You could lose $250+ from your trading account deposit. Con #3: You could become a victim of identity theft. Con #4: You'll definitely waste your time using a sure-to-fail system.

Our Recommendation: Save yourself the headache and the hassle of being scammed by this binary options "opportunity." Get on the road to a realistic income with our top recommendation instead.

Full Review

George Gabriel feels he must warn you about something on in the world of binary options trading. Apparently, it’s false advertising, and it’s being perpetrated by scammers.

confirmed profits

Luckily for you, George is not a scammer. He even says so.


In fact, George is actually a software developer (as well as company President and Head Developer). He and his company, Confirmed Profits, have created a new binary options trading software, also called Confirmed Profits. This software has an amazing 96.6% prediction accuracy. George is looking for beta testers before his software is released to the public for sale.

Audited, verified, certified and confirmed!

“These results can’t be faked,” says George. “My company has gone to a great deal of effort and along with a great deal of expenses in having all of the users’ results audited, verified, certified and confirmed…by an independent third party.”

Don’t forget authenticated, George. My thesaurus also gave me “substantiated,” “documented” and “corroborated.”

Who is this “independent third party” that George speaks of? It’s a site called Trade Verify.

Is Trade Verify real?

When you go to the Trade Verify website, everything appears legit, at least at first. The company notes that it has recently verified George C. of Confirmed Profits, along with MT Financial Bot v4.0. The business is itself verified by Allen & Overy, a well-known global law firm. There’s a even a link to that law firm at the bottom of Trade Verify’s website, so it’s got to be real.

The “proof” starts falling apart quickly when you dig deeper. For example, here is a screen shot of Trade Verify’s “verification board:”

verification board

To begin with, companies that feature their staff or boards typically pose and photograph each person in a professional setting and wearing professional dress. There is no variation from one staff or board member to the next. Here above, you see two individuals wearing T-shirts while one person is wearing what appears to be a suit. Two individuals are posing in front of a gray or white background, and one individual appears to be posing outside.

But let’s now focus on the individuals themselves.

Dan Whitworth, apparently, goes by the alias of Christopher Mitchell.


Laurie McLean is also known as Alexandra Johnson.


Thomas Pickford is Edwin Darlow.


There are several possible explanations for why these board members all have double identities: a) they are secret double agents, b) these photos were swiped and re-posted by Trade Verify webmasters, or c) these are stock photos.

Then there is “Roger Hall,” the independent notary that Trade Verify boasts.

roger hall

Interestingly, I did locate a notary named Roger Hall while searching for this person online. But that business profile had no attached photo. As far as the portrayed photo of Roger Hall, it could actually belong to Milton P. for all we know:


I should add that Milton P. is quite prolific and has four results pages on Google linking him to all sorts of businesses and product/service testimonials. This tells me that Roger Hall is also either a) a secret quad-decuple agent (given his 40 different listed aliases/businesses) or b) yet another photo swipe/stock photo purchase.

Another issue with Trade Verify is its utter lack of contact information, aside from a single support email that is shown to you rather discretely when you click on the Contact tab. There’s no phone number, no physical address, and no actual way you can reach the so-called independent notary or verification board. This is not how a legitimate business operates.

What about the satisfied customers?

Here are Confirmed Profits customers/testers Elena Roslinsky, Mo Chakrabarti and Dan Kindred. There are many more such customers/testers, which Confirmed Profits shows off in the lower half of its website.


Using Google image search, I compiled the following collage of each of these customer’s secret identities.


Again, we see that these scammers are either swiping already existing photos or just buying stock photography.

The truth is out there (in the fine print)

Do you want to learn where Confirmed Profits really stands regarding its supposed customers/beta testers and its “live” trades? Look no further than its disclaimer area, where the fine print gives you the real deal. Statements like these are immediate red flags for me:

…cannot and does not guarantee or warrant that files available for downloading from the Internet will be free of viruses, worms, Trojan horses or other code that may manifest contaminating or destructive properties.

Hypothetical or simulated performance results have certain limitations. Unlike an actual performance record, simulated results don’t represent actual trading. And since the trades haven’t been executed the results may have under-or-over compensated for the impact, if any, of certain market factors…

Simulated trading programs in general are also subject to the fact that they’re designed with the benefit of hindsight.

In some cases actors have been used. This is a new system and there are no typical results.

Where does it all lead back?

One word: Clicksure

Like many other binary options scams, the real reason they keep popping up is because of $250 commissions like these offered via the affiliate network Clicksure:


Until binary options brokers find a different way to convert their audiences, binary options scammers will continue taking these affiliate offers and spinning them into all kinds of wild tales about fast money and automated trading software.

The best thing you can do, at least in the meantime, is stay away.

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