Vemma: A Healthy Scam?

17 Comments
Post Pic

We all want to be healthy, to eat right, to exercise plenty and to feel good in our own skin. Sometimes though, it is hard work to stay fit and healthy, and having supplements can help us out.

Enter Vemma. They sell a vitamin & mineral supplement drink.

I bet you are thinking, “OK Dean, why are you talking about health drinks?” The reason is because Vemma is also an MLM company, and while I will state right now that it is not a scam or illegal, please read on to find out why you should think carefully about signing up or even avoid this one at all costs.

Vemma the MLM

Just a refresher for those that don’t know, MLM stands for Multi Level Marketing but is also known as Network Marketing.

The basic premise is that you sell the products and recruit other people underneath you to also sell the products of which you get a small commission.

The general rule of thumb with MLM systems though is it’s only the people at the top (the owners) that make any money or any real money.

You can sign up to Vemma and get a bunch of different products from them:

  • 4 bottles of Vemma® (32-oz bottles, 30-day supply for 2 people)
  • 1 V2 Fridge Brick (30 – 2-oz bottles)
  • 2 bottles of Vemma NEXT® (32-oz bottles)
  • 24 cans of Verve® Energy Drink (8.3-oz cans)
  • 12 cans of Verve Zero Sugar Energy Drink (8.3-oz cans)
  • 12 cans of Verve Bold Energy Drink (8.3-oz cans)
  • 1 bag of Bod•ē Shake Vanilla Ice Cream flavor (16 meals/bag)
  • 1 bag of Bod•ē Shake Chocolate Ice Cream flavor (16 meals/bag)
  • 1 Vemma Success Kit

On top of that you will get a Business Builder Pack, which consists of:

  • A FREE marketing website which utilizes social media to help you tell your story like never before.
  • A FREE mobile app with innovative text videos and cutting-edge tracking to manage your business activity.
  • A FREE success kit with the necessary tools every new Brand Partner should have to help you jump-start your business.
  • A variety of Vemma products to share with others.
  • A proven system of training tools and field leadership support.
  • Full eligibility for the Rewards & Recognition Program, including a brand-new BMW paid for by Vemma.
  • Freedom and flexibility to be in control of your business, your time and your success.
  • A supportive upline and a corporate Home Office team of industry-experienced professionals dedicated to your success.
  • A lucrative income from products you never have to ship or exchange money for. No merchant accounts, shipping, processing, customer service or other tedious tasks.

The Downside

I listed everything you get because all of this costs a fortune! To get started with Vemma, the basic package (outlined above) costs $499.95 or $999.95 for a bigger pack.

48 drinks, 32 portions of icecream and a marketing kit for $500 bucks? WOW!

Not only that but after purchase you are set up automatically to pay $126 a month for 2 32oz bottles.

Edit: You can actually get started with Vemma without buying anything, but it is so hard to find this information I bet virtually no one does.

This is a lot of money to pay for out of pocket on a product that is expensive to sell, with no guarantee of selling it. Most of Vemma’s competing products can be bought at a supermarket for half the price, and there is no solid evidence that Vemma’s products will actually improve fitness or health.

The site makes bold claims that you can make a full time wage with a part time job by selling Vemma. In order to do that, you would need an awful lot of marketing and face-to-face sales, and some competency with online marketing.

The company does provide basic websites for those members who are buying into their products but realistically speaking these sites are cookie cutter sites, and you would be better off with your own.

The reality of Vemma, just like with any other MLM system, is that in order to make a profit and to regain money spent on purchasing the product (as you will have to give at least some of it away as testers) you need to sell a LOT and you need to recruit a LOT.

The company doesn’t pay you for selling though they do give you reward points for hiring new sellers. You have to make the money back by selling an already over priced product.

I would love to know how much Vemma earns from the distributors buying the product compared to how much the distributors earn.

Something tells me Vemma gets the better end of the deal.

The Bottom Line

Regular readers will know that I am not fond of MLM schemes, whether there is a product to sell like with Vemma or MLM’s evil brother the Pyramid scheme.

However, as mentioned at the start, Vemma is not a scam. It is a large, international company that’s uses an MLM system to sell products. If nothing else, you do get something for your cash even if it is an overpriced health drink.

Generally speaking, 97-99% of people who sell products under an MLM system will not make any money; many of those will in fact lose money.

So unless you want the product for yourself with the possibility of offsetting the cost by selling some from time to time, or unless you are an amazing marketing who could sell snow to Eskimos then MLM programs like Vemma should be avoided.

There's only ONE program I really recommend. It helped me turn my 'hobby' into a $6,000+ per month money making machine. Click here for the exact formula I followed.

Photo credit by vasta

17 Comments

  1. Sherry Wendell says:

    While most of these “get rich quick” schemes are MLM, I have to say that after drinking VEMMA I felt better. Now did I go run a marathon or stop taking ALL of medications because it was a miracle drug? No, but I will say I feel better on many levels and my digestive system is healthier. Statistics and results have shown that liquid products get into the blood stream quicker and more effective than pills so to each his own but it worked for me.

    Reply
  2. Great post! I think that Vemma just want the distributors to become the customers so they can get sustainable income by them 😉

    Reply
  3. Horrible. A person actually harassed me about my sales the day after I lost a pet. And when I called the corporate office they were worse. (if that were possible) AVOID THIS COMPANY!

    Reply
  4. I actually signed up without having to put any money down. I understood the whole MLM concept from the beginning and it is not a sustainable model! If you want to try it out get a friend to use your email to sign up. Youll have the whole marketing pack without buying anything!

    Reply
  5. To Jane Doe… I have a few questions for you.
    What is a system upgrade?
    What is a merchant account?
    What is the advertising you’re talking about?
    What the hell is this package that costs $8,307?!?
    I can tell you right now that none of that is necessary or required to make money from Vemma. I have never heard of any of that. Send me an email at chrisdburns1@gmail.com and I will try my best to help you out.

    If what you’re saying here is true, you did not meet the right people in Vemma.

    Reply
  6. Jane Doe says:

    I joined Vemma 2 weeks ago and have invested $1,061 so far plus a system upgrade at $70 a month, a merchant account for $99 a month and on this step of my training I am supposed to purchase advertising at ridiculous rates…they recommended to make $1,500 a month I need to get a package that costs $8,307. I was all for this up until then. I mean how do you make a profit with those stats? I am a single mother of 2 young children with no other family around. I put all of my savings and even some borrowed money into this because I was led to believe I would make it back in a month. I am so scared and worried right now. Does anyone have any insight that might help? Is my money really gone? I am in shock right now.

    Reply
  7. Here’s the thing I have several friends who sell this right now. None of them had to pay huge out of pocket costs. And none of them have pushed me into trying to sell it. I’ve been able to buy the products, which I like, just as a simple customer.

    Reply
  8. The more I research Vemma’s MLM, the more it looks like a scam. Additionally, the way it was described to me from someone who drank the kool aid lines up with the characteristics of a pyramid scheme. As expected, my friend was quick to defend Vemma and cease any further communication. Like a virus, it needs a host survive and to spread in order to continue existing.

    Reply
    1. Dean Robinson says:

      MJ you are spot on with your virus analogy. Vemma is an MLM and MLM’s are at best risky, and at worse they will burn a hole through your wallet.

  9. Tiffany, Vemma isn’t a get rich quick scheme by any means. Like anything it takes time and effort to actually make money. It may not be the conventional way to do business but it’s a different way. You’ve all made up your minds and I wouldn’t try to convince you of anything. But MLM’s are legit, the marketing strategy is just different than what we are used to. It’s not for everyone which is totally fine. But especially for people that already spend their money on Red Bull every day like a friend of mine, it makes sense. Instead if he put his money towards Verve, he is getting a healthier product which the ability to get paid whereas he wouldn’t with Red Bull. It’s all a business expense as well. All tax deductible.

    Reply
  10. This is a complete scam! My boyfriend got a random call from his cousin tonight out of the blue to meet up with her and that she has “life changing news to share with him”. When he called me and told me this i was already sketched out. He met her at a random address he’d never been to. When she finally showed up she was with a large number of people. They made him watch the youtube video. He texted me what was going on and i immediately jumped on the internet and did my research. I was able to give him statistics and tell him exactly what this company was going to say before they had a chance to even say it to him. This really saved us from being out 500.00 as my boyfriend is one of those to jump to get rich quick schemes. Thank you for this article and for everyone that shared there experience with Vemma it really made a difference for us!

    Reply
  11. I’ve been approached by the “opportunity” more than once. Fortunately, if it sounds too good to be true, it normally is. Team members talk only about the “making $$$” side more than the actual products. Biggest red flag. I’m sure you can make money but I would definitely prefer a more reliable & consistent source of income.

    Reply
  12. Tonight I attended a Vemma get together at someone’s house. The presentation given was great, if you only care about money. There were three speakers and almost no discussion of the products for sale. After an hour of speeches and a short socializing session, I left knowing that they sell energy drinks, that’s all. Upon arriving home and researching, I discovered there is an array of products.

    Reply
  13. Just went to a meeting about this in someone’s house. There was maybe 20 people and maybe 5-7 weren’t partners. It was SKETCHY AS HELL! After a short presentation it turned into a house party which was nice and there were a few new BMWs and Mercedes parked outside which belonged to them but whenever I tried to get a direct answer from anyone they either dodged the question, told me I should talk to one of their buddies, or just started talking about something else. In the end I still new next to nothing about how money is made. Not going back.

    Reply
  14. For what it is, Vemma’s verve is actually quite a good product, albeit (like most MLM’s products) a bit on the expensive side. Still, the price is on-par with what most people pay for Red Bull and similar products in retail stores

    Verve = Not my cup of tea though as I have about 1100 in my downline in drinkACT, which is now owned by Youngevity

    Reply
  15. Christian K says:

    About a year ago my friend mentioned this program. They were very convincing, and I feel like a fool for taking the bait. Also, it was 1AM and it sounded delicious and helpful. 500 dollars later, I had my “Oh crap” moment. My friend told me that everyone on my team would be helpful, and although they were, they basically just told me to tell specific lines to people. I had a basic understanding of how it worked when I made an effort, yet they still said “tell them that you don’t know much about the program, and direct them towards us so we can talk with them. Tell them what you would want to hear.” Then I realized that was done to me. The team members also said “Let’s get out there and killlll ittttt” a lot, which I found highly annoying. Bottom line, it was a foolish choice, but it was also a learning experience. Plus, now I’m always in stock of that energy drink, which is actually quite tasty. So I suppose it isn’t a COMPLETE loss.

    Reply
  16. Cindi Allen says:

    Just wanted to say, how weird, since I almost did this one once. I decided against it because of the cost, and because they only had a few products, none of which I would really want to buy myself. I’m glad to know that I made the right decision. While MLMs are legit, it seems that no one really makes alot from them, and the products are usually hard to sell. I’ve tried many of these type things, and recetly re-joined Wealthy Affiliate, and while there’s a lot to learn, I think it’s the only way to truly have your own business, from what I’ve tried anyway, and really make a decent living. I’m so glad, since I have wasted so much time and money on things that just don’t pan out.

    Reply

Leave a Reply