Is Virtual Juror a Legitimate Job?

3 Comments

This one is new to me, though the concept has been around for some time. It seems to be picking up some steam, though, so I thought we should take a closer look.

What Is a Virtual Juror?

Several sites are advertising a “virtual juror” job, which allegedly pays up to $10 hour. The sites include virtualjuror.com, ejury.com, onlinejury.com, and a couple of others.

These sites claim that attorneys will pay you to review cases, or parts of their cases, so that they can sort of “test drive” their case on people that might be like people that will be on real juries. You review the case under consideration and then answer questions about it in an online format. The site that gave you the case pays you via PayPal.

The Truth

Like many online opportunities, this one has a grain of truth to it. There is at least one site that appears to have a legitimate business model: ejury.com. It costs you nothing to sign up, the terms and conditions are easy to find and clearly stated, and it is as clear as possible about what exactly you will be doing. Even more important, it is clear about your income potential:

“For each verdict rendered, eJurors are paid $5 – $10 depending on the length of the case. The amount to be paid will be shown at the top of each case. You certainly won’t get rich serving as an eJuror, but just one case a week would probably pay for your Internet access.”

The problem with the concept and with ejury.com is that your chances of getting a case are very slim. Few number of cases divided by a large number in the jury pool means don’t count on this to pay your cable bill.

The Dark Side

You knew there was a dark side, didn’t you? This post is credited to alert reader, Erik, who read about ejury.com and went to do some research about the virtual juror concept.

What did he find? A Web site that charges you $97 for access to a list of companies that are paying for such work. This site is virtualjuror.com, and I recommend you stay away. What do you get for your $97?

Within 48 hours [business days only] of Paypals confirmation to Virtual Juror of your payment, you will receive special links that will take you where you will start the application process. Again, there is nothing else to pay for. Should you provide excellent service we believe you will be chosen time and again to review many cases. [Emphasis mine]

No Terms and Conditions and a clearly stated “no refunds” policy. You see, the list of links is an electronic product so they can’t offer refunds.

I won’t be paying the $97 to find out, but I would bet that ejury.com is on the list. In fact, here’s a challenge to you, VirtualJuror.com Internet sharketer dude: pay me $97, show me your list, and if ejury.com isn’t on it, I’ll publish an “I Was Wrong” post. (Oh, and since a blog post is an electronic product, the $97 is non-refundable.)

Stay Away from VirtualJuror.com

So yeah, Erik was right. He said he knows that any site that wants you to pay for a job isn’t legitimate. Virtualjuror.com is not offering you a job. It’s trying to sell you information that is not worth much and freely available elsewhere.

I don’t think virtualjuror.com is setting out to deceive anyone. In fact, it even states in fine print at the bottom of the page:

The websites we send you too have no fees and can be found by anyone, but we save you the hours of research and provide these specials links to you for a one time administration fee.

I have no problem with that: there is value in compiling information and presenting it in a convenient format for people. But $97 is too much for a list of companies that offer such small income potential.

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3 Comments

    1. I am a member of ejury.com. And I have reviewed several cases. The work is very easy, simply read through the case file. And then answer a few questions (10-25 questions). Admittedly, some of the case specific instructions and questions are not very well written. This can leave you scratching your head in confusion. But overall, the work is very easy.

      However, as you have already mentioned, getting a case can be just a little bit frustrating. You may go months between cases. So, think of it more as an on again / off again hobby rather than a telecommutting job.

    2. I’ve done one case with ejury and I was very impressed. I ride along with my husband who is an over-the-road truck driver, and I do little side jobs to help pay for Netflix and Hulu and to keep me entertained. I’ve always been fascinated by true crime and the legal system, so when I discovered ejury I was fascinated and signed up. That was a few months ago and I’ve had one case because I’m from a small area, but I found the information well put together and it didn’t take much time to earn my $7.

      Then, I waited for the rest of the jurors to submit their verdicts and got the email that I was going to be paid on Friday via Paypal. Sure enough, my payment posted first thing Friday morning and now I keep checking the site, just hoping for another case. :)

      So yes, don’t expect this to be a second job because it’s not a guaranteed thing by any means, but it is a fun way to make some money.

    3. I’ve been with eJury for 10 years now and have only had one case. I am in the Dallas area of Texas, so definitely not a small town. The case did pay on time, but honestly, I’ve forgotten all about it as I’m not getting any cases.

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