An Insider’s View of TextBroker.com

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We received a tip about TextBroker.com on our freelance writing jobs directory page. Halina, who had signed up for TextBroker after reading the comment, has offered to share her experiences since joining the program. Here they are.

I’ve been writing freelance for two years now, starting with Helium, then moving on to Associated Content, Constant Content, and lately, Textbroker.com. I’ve also written articles for my company and even submitted a few pieces to local Madison newspapers. The pay has been decent but nothing for which I would quit my day job. At this moment, I’ve made over $1400 on Associated Content, about $400 on Constant Content, and exactly $10.87 since joining Textbroker two days ago.

I initially discovered Textbroker because of a comment about it on www.ivetriedthat.com. I decided to give the site a try and signed up. Textbroker requires that you submit a writing sample in order to be assigned an author star rating of 2-5, with 2 stars being considered average, 3 stars good, and 4 stars excellent writing ability. The 5 star rating is reserved for professional writers, and I’m not sure how one obtains that qualification.

Within the same day, I received my author rating of 4 stars. This allowed me to claim and submit articles asking for writing quality of 2-4 stars. The higher one’s star rating, the more one is paid per word, so it pays to submit your best writing sample. Currently, my pay is 1.5 cents per word.

My first submission was accepted within 12 hours of submission and paid me $4.90 for about 400 words. The next day, I submitted another article, which was also quickly accepted and paid $5.88. I then received two DirectOrders, which is when clients request that you write for them specifically. I have since submitted one DirectOrder, which was then returned to me for editing. I re-submitted the article today. Should I have the latest article accepted, I will make up to $6.00 (the article is 400 words).

Textbroker will also evaluate your accepted articles and assign them a rating. The better your articles, the higher your rating and payment per word.

That I like most about Textbroker is that you do not have to write long articles. Many client requests are for 150-250 word articles. Coupled with the higher than average payment per word, that means I can easily turn out 2-3 articles in one evening and make a quick $15 or so. What I don’t like about Textbroker is that you need to wait a long time for payout; the site pays everyone only once monthly, on the 10th of the month.

This post was written by Halina. When not hunting out money-making opportunities online, Halina can be found making money on Associated Content at the following site: Associated Content.

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96 Comments

  1. Halina Zakowicz says:

    Hello Krusyos,
    Thank you for your comment. Wow, this entire post is certainly a blast from the past for me. You see, I started out by writing on content mill sites like Textbroker. However, at this point in time, I steer clear of them for several reasons.

    If I were starting all over again as a writer and just wanted to make a few bucks, then yeah, I’d try out Textbroker. However, because of the many limitations of Textbroker, I’d also try a few other things, like guest posting on paid blogs, starting my own blog, and even pitching to young adult magazines.

    You see, Textbroker might give you experience in writing as well as a little money, but you won’t get the clips that writers depend on when pitching real world clients for real world writing rates. So I’m on the fence about whether Textbroker is the best way to spend your time.

    If you’d like to know more, just let me know- and good luck to you!

    Reply
  2. I’m a teenager who wants to be a freelance/online writer for a career when I graduate from high school. Do you think that TextBroker is a good starting point where I can hone my writing skills, get experience in the field, and make a few bucks on the side for coffee and music? Would you recommend another site instead? I’m a homeschooled student, and due to my flexible schedule, I can probably be writing all day.

    Reply

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